Bibliography

Day C. Amylin analogue as an antidiabetic agent. Br J Diabetes Vasc Dis 2005; 5: 151-4

DeFronzo RA, Ratner RE, Han J, et al. Effects of exenatide (exendin-4) on glycemic control and weight over 30 weeks in metformin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care 2005; 28: 1092-100

Finer N, Pagotto U. The endocannabinoid system: a new therapeutic target for cardiovascular risk factor management. Br J Diabetes Vasc Dis 2005; 5: 121-4

Green BD, Irwin N, Gault VA, et al. Development and therapeutic potential of incretin hormone analogues for type 2 diabetes. Br J Diabetes Vasc Dis 2005; 5: 134-40

Melitus Type

Figure 153 Intact islet cells ready for islet cell transplantation. The islets are isolated from donated human pancreas, suspended during partial digestion and centrifuged in a cooled centrifuge. The retrieval of good quality islets from donor pancreases is critical to the success of islet cell transplantation

Edmonton ProtocolPortal Vein Venogram

Figure 154 Portal venogram showing the hepatic portal vein prior to administration of isolated human islets. In the Edmonton protocol, an adequate mass of freshly isolated islets are embolized for transplantation into the liver through a small catheter placed into the main portal vein. Novel immunosuppressive regimens, as outlined in the text, have led to an increased success rate of this experimental mode of therapy of diabetes

Pancreas Transplant Success Rate

Figure 155 Several pharmaceutical companies have developed inhaled short-acting insulin preparations using different technology and inhalation devices. One such product, Exubera® (Pfizer) has recently been granted marketing authorization by the European Commission and will shortly be available on prescription. Clinical studies have attested to an efficiency of inhaled insulin to control daytime blood glucose levels comparable to that of soluble insulin. Regulatory agencies have expressed concern about long-term pulmonary safety

Diabetes 2

Diabetes 2

Diabetes is a disease that affects the way your body uses food. Normally, your body converts sugars, starches and other foods into a form of sugar called glucose. Your body uses glucose for fuel. The cells receive the glucose through the bloodstream. They then use insulin a hormone made by the pancreas to absorb the glucose, convert it into energy, and either use it or store it for later use. Learn more...

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment