Neuropathies Associated With Pain

As stated earlier, a number of the neuropathic syndromes associated with diabetes may be accompanied by painful symptomatology: these are summarized in Table 1.

Focal and Multifocal Neuropathies

Although discussed in detail in Chapter 22, a brief description of those associated with painful symptomatology is provided here (7,8). Those cranial mononeuropathies affecting the nerves supplying the external ocular muscles typically present with sudden onset of diplopia and an ipsilateral headache often described as a dull pain coming from behind the eye. Similarly, many of the focal limb neuropathies including entrapment neuropathies (7) might present with painful symptoms in the area supplied by the individual nerve. The tarsal tunnel syndrome, which is analogous to the carpal tunnel syndrome in the upper limbs, may present with localized foot pain, which should be distinguished from the pain of the diffuse sensorimotor neuropathy.

Other focal limb neuropathies presenting with painful symptoms include meralgia paraesthetica: in this condition, which involves compression of the lateral cutaneous nerve of thigh, neuropathic symptoms occur in the lateral area of the thigh. Diabetic

Table 2

Contrasts Between Acute Sensory and Chronic Sensorimotor Neuropathies

Table 2

Contrasts Between Acute Sensory and Chronic Sensorimotor Neuropathies

Diabetes 2

Diabetes 2

Diabetes is a disease that affects the way your body uses food. Normally, your body converts sugars, starches and other foods into a form of sugar called glucose. Your body uses glucose for fuel. The cells receive the glucose through the bloodstream. They then use insulin a hormone made by the pancreas to absorb the glucose, convert it into energy, and either use it or store it for later use. Learn more...

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