Female Sexual Dysfunction

Female sexual dysfunctions (FSD) include persistent or recurrent disorders of sexual interest/desire, disorders of subjective and genital arousal, orgasm disorder, pain and difficulty with attempted or completed intercourse. The scientific knowledge on sexual dysfunction in women with diabetes is rudimentary. Sexual dysfunction was observed in 27% of women with type 1 diabetes. FSD was not related to age, BMI, HbAlc, duration of diabetes, and diabetic complications. However, FSD was related to depression and the quality of the partner relationship (71). Recently, the prevalence of FSD in premenopausal women with the metabolic syndrome was compared with the general female population. Women with the metabolic syndrome had reduced mean full female sexual function index score, reduced satisfaction rate, and higher circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP). There was an inverse relation between CRP levels and female sexual function index score (72).

Problems affecting sexuality in women with diabetes are fatigue, changes in peri-menstrual blood glucose control, vaginitis, decreased sexual desire, decreased vaginal lubrication, and an increased time to reach orgasm. Even minor episodes of depression, which is twice more frequent than in men can result in a loss of libido. To which degree these symptoms are related to autonomic neuropathy has also been examined in a few studies, the results of which are at variance (73). The examination for a women with diabetes with sexual dysfunction should include the duration of symptoms, psychological state, concommitant, medications, presence of vaginitis, cystitis and other infections, frequency of intercourse, blood pressure, BMI, retinal status, pelvic examination, presence of discharge, and glycemic control (74).

Diabetes 2

Diabetes 2

Diabetes is a disease that affects the way your body uses food. Normally, your body converts sugars, starches and other foods into a form of sugar called glucose. Your body uses glucose for fuel. The cells receive the glucose through the bloodstream. They then use insulin a hormone made by the pancreas to absorb the glucose, convert it into energy, and either use it or store it for later use. Learn more...

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