Aerobic Exercise Options

Here are some aerobic activities you might enjoy The following are NOT considered aerobic activities There are many practical ways to increase your activity. Walking is one of the easiest you can walk to the store instead of driving, walk the dog, park farther from your destination and walk the rest of the way, get off the bus a stop or two early and walk the extra few blocks. Walking is an ideal exercise no matter what your age. It's safe and inexpensive, requires less strength than many...

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Basic Nutrition for People with Diabetes Guidelines for Healthier Eating Exchange Lists General Principles and Specifics Starch Bread Meat Vegetables Fruits Milk Combination Foods 4 Exercise and Exchanges P. A Sample Diet Diet is a vital component in your overall diabetes control program. Your diabetes educator, dietitian, and doctor will develop a personal meal plan to help you attain appropriate blood sugar (glucose) and blood fat (cholesterol and triglyceride) levels. If you have...

Chapter Oral Medications

Oral Medications for Type II Diabetes Sometimes diet alone is not enough to control Type II diabetes. Your doctor may prescribe oral hypoglycemic agents (pills) as a supplement to diet and exercise for controlling your diabetes. There are several kinds of pills for helping to lower blood sugar. None of these pills is insulin If diet, exercise, and oral hypoglycemic agents are not enough to control your blood sugar, then insulin may be needed. One kind of pills uses a sulfa-containing compound...

Charting Your Progress

Keep a log of your exercise program, including activity, duration, before and after blood sugars, and insulin reactions that occur during and after exercising. This information helps you measure your progress and avoid exercise-related reactions. The chart on the next page covers the first 8 weeks of your exercise program. You'll be proud of your progress, and you'll feel healthier and stronger each day

Combination Foods

Much of what we eat is mixed together in combination foods t do not fit into any one exchange list. Sometimes it's difficult to know the ingredients in a casserole or baked food item. This exchange list will help you fit combination foods into your meal plan. You can always check with your dietitian for information about any other foods you'd like to eat. The American Diabetes Association American Dietetic Association Family Cookbooks and the American Diabetes Association Holiday Cookbook...

Diabetes and the Family

Part II Advice for Parents of Children with Diabetes Part III What School Personnel Should Know About the Student with Diabetes 4 General Information 4 Insulin Reactions 4 General Advice 4 Teacher Information This chapter addresses special concerns of families coping with diabetes. Part I focuses on the special needs of women with diabetes during pregnancy. Part II provides advice for parents of children with diabetes. Part III provides information for school personnel who have contact with...

Diabetes Complications

People with diabetes are vulnerable to a variety of complications over time. Health-care providers all agree that strict control of blood sugar makes complications less likely. This was shown clearly by the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial. Control of blood sugar is the best way to minimize the risk of complications. Even the very best control may not be able to eliminate all complications, and the risk of increases with the length of time you have diabetes. Diabetes complications...

Foods For Occasional

The foods on this list can be included in your meal plan, despite their sugar or fat content, provided you maintain blood-glucose control. Average exchange values are listed for each item because these foods are concentrated sources of carbohydrates, the serving are small. Check with your dietitian for advice on how often and when you can enjoy these foods.

Keeping in Balance

To stay healthy, you need to learn to balance insulin, food, and exercise. The body of a person without diabetes produces just the right amount of insulin to maintain a normal blood glucose level. If he does not eat, very little insulin is produced. If he eats a lot, his body produces much more insulin. Because your body is not producing insulin, you must obtain it through injections. The insulin you inject in the morning controls a predefined amount of blood glucose. If you skip a meal, the...

My Meal Plan in Exchanges

It's often helpful to use a little chart like this one to help you make a meal plan that's nutritious, that's good for taking care of your diabetes, and that has foods in it that you like. It's often helpful to use a little chart like this one to help you make a meal plan that's nutritious, that's good for taking care of your diabetes, and that has foods in it that you like.

Oral Hypoglycemic Pills and Illness

If you take oral hypoglycemic pills, you must watch for signs of low blood sugar during any illness that causes you to vomit or keeps you from eating and drinking normally. The hypoglycemic pills you took before your illness continue working to lower your blood sugar even when you do not increase it by taking in food. Try to replace missing carbohydrates by eating soup, crackers, or toast, or by drinking ginger ale or cola. Test your blood glucose or urine every few hours. If your blood glucose...

Questions and Answers

Are there any side effects associated with oral hypoglycemic agents Side effects of most of the diabetes pills, the sulfonylureas, biguanides, Prandin, and Rezulin, are rare, but they can occur. Call your doctor if you experience Upset stomach or loss of appetite Flushing (if you have had an alcoholic beverage) Acarbose (Precose) can cause stomach discomfort, gas, and diarrhea, and for that reason it must be started at a low dose. Even then, many people cannot take advantage of it. 2. Can the...

The Diabetic Diet

Your diabetic diet is a well-balanced meal plan tailored to your individual needs, tastes, activity level and life style. Meal times and types and amounts of foods are planned and adjusted just for you. You may need to learn more about foods, and you may have to make some changes in your eating habits. The better you understand your diet, the more flexibility you can enjoy. Your dietitian is there to get you started on your way to good nutrition and better health. He or she can help you tailor...

Your Own Coping Skills

How do you feel about having diabetes Do you see it as a daily challenge, one that requires your own strength, energy, and attention as well as the support of your fiends and family If so, you're probably coping well with your diabetes. You understand that diabetes is a serious condition, but you are optimistic about your treatment plan. You're committed to taking responsibility for your self-care, to following your regimen, and to learning as much as you can about your diabetes. You trust your...

Your Role

You must learn to take control of your diabetes on a day-to-day basis. This will be easier the more you learn about your diabetes. Learn about and practice self-care. This includes self-monitoring of blood glucose and learning how to change your treatment regimen according to the results. Examine your feet on a regular basis. Follow good life-style practices. These include choosing the right food, maintaining a health weight, getting regular exercise, and avoiding smoking. Know when to contact...

Controlling Type I Diabetes

To control your diabetes, your health-care provider will prescribe a regimen of insulin injections, diet, and exercise, and you will learn to monitor your blood glucose level. Insulin injections are necessary because your body does not produce insulin to funnel glucose into your cells. For information on insulin, see Chapter 8. Your diabetes diet Is a well-balanced meal plan that controls the types and amounts of food you eat. For information on the diabetes diet, see Chapter 6. Exercise...

Goals for People with Type I Diabetes

Learning that you have Type I diabetes may be frightening, but you can help yourself by learning to control your condition. Keep the following goals in mind Becoming self-reliant and self-sufficient Balancing diet, exercise, and insulin Leading an active life that is as close to normal as possible Protecting your heart, nerves, blood vessels, eyes, and kidneys by controlling your blood glucose level Maintaining a good body weight Growing and developing normally (especially for children) If you...

Your Guide To Better Diabetes Care Rights Roles

An individual with diabetes can, in general, lead a normal, healthy, and long life. Looking after yourself and learning about your diabetes provide the best chance to do this. Your doctor and the other members of the health-care team (made up of doctors, nurses, dietitians, and chiropodists) are there to advise you and to provide the information, support, and technology for you to look after yourself and live your life in the way you choose. It is important for you to know what your health-care...

Check With Your Diabetes Educator Or Doctor For Advice On Insulin Adjustments

Exercise speeds absorption of insulin, so avoid injecting into parts of your body that will be exercised during your activity. If you are planning leg muscle exercise (jogging, skiing, cycling), inject insulin into the abdomen or arms. For arm muscle activities (scrubbing walls, doing push ups, washing the car), inject into the abdomen or leg. For sports that use all body muscles (swimming, basketball), the safest place to inject is the abdomen. Always watch for signs of hypoglycemia (see...

Controlling Your Type II Diabetes

To control your Type II diabetes, you need to eat right, stay active, monitor your control, follow your diabetes educator's or doctor's orders, and have regular checkups. Eating right helps you control your weight. Weight is the most important factor in Type II diabetes control. Eat healthy foods, and if you are overweight, follow a meal plan to lose weight. For information on nutrition for people with diabetes, see Chapter 6. Staying active with exercise burns calories to help you control your...

Other Types of Diabetes

People whose blood contains more glucose than normal, but less than occurs in diabetes, may be diagnosed with a condition called impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Some women experience a rise in their blood glucose level during pregnancy. These women have a condition called gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Their blood glucose levels usually return to normal after their babies are born. Other types of diabetes may occur as a result of diseases of the pancreas or the endocrine (gland) system,...

Exercise for the Overweight Person with Type II Diabetes

You may not feel like exercising because you are tired, and moving around takes a lot of effort. But you'll feel better when your diabetes is in good control, and you can help make this happen by following your diet and exercising. Exercise decreases your appetite and helps your own insulin work better. Exercise also burns up food calories and calories stored in body as fat. By using more calories than you eat, you'll lose weight, and when you lose weight, you'll be able to move with less...

Psychological Aspects of Diabetes

Some people just don't believe they have diabetes. They don't see why they need to follow a diabetes care plan. Other people understand in their minds that they have diabetes, but still do not follow their care plans. These are forms of denial. It can take time to overcome denial, but the sooner you accept your diagnosis and begin learning about your diabetes, the sooner you'll achieve independence and good health under your care plan. Most people diagnosed with diabetes experience anger. It is...

This handbook embodies the approach of the diabetes care team at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center

While most teams are in close agreement regarding the GENERAL PRINCIPLES of diabetes care, they may differ in the DETAILS. There can be more that one right way to approach a specific issue in diabetes management. Always remain in touch with your diabetes care team, and bring any questions you may have about the materials in this handbook to their attention Copyright 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998 Ruth E. Lundstrom, R.N., John P. Mordes, M.D., Aldo A. Rossini, M.D....

Exercise for People with Type I Diabetes

Make it a habit to increase your food when you plan extra exercise. Team sports are fun, and there's no reason you shouldn't participate freely. But you must take extra food every hour during strenuous exercise to balance the calories you are burning. And you must always have fast acting sugar with you in case of a reaction . An insulin reaction is still possible hours after exercising. During prolonged, strenuous exercise (longer than 1 hour) sugar may be borrowed from your muscles and liver....

Oral Medications for Type II Diabetes

Since their introduction in the late 1950s, oral hypoglycemic agents have helped millions of people with Type II diabetes maintain control of their blood glucose levels. There are now several different kinds of oral medications for diabetes that act in very different ways. Follow the hyperlinks for more detailed information. 1. Pills that help put more insulin in the bloodstream the Sulfonylurea (sulfa containing) Type Pills o First-generation (original) oral hypoglycemics include Diabinase,...

Goals for People with Type II Diabetes

With Type II diabetes, you can enjoy a healthy, normal life by maintaining control of your condition. Keep the following goals in mind Learning about your diabetes and how to take care of yourself Keeping your body healthy by achieving your ideal weight Strengthening your heart and lungs through exercise Minimizing the risk of complications by maintaining good blood sugar levels If you have Type II (non-insulin dependent) diabetes, your body has a relative deficiency of insulin. The beta cells...

Nerves

Nearly 70 of persons with diabetes experience some degree of nerve damage or neuropathy. Neuropathy occurs in people with Type I and Type II diabetes, due to metabolic changes associated with diabetes. Constant high blood sugar destroys both nerve fiber (axon) and the fatty insulation that surrounds it (myelin ). Damaged nerves do not transmit proper signals, resulting in a loss of sensation, hypersensation, or pain. Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form. Varying from mild to severe, it...

What should my blood glucose levels be

Your personal goal depends on your age, type of diabetes and how long you've had it, other health conditions, life style, and desire for control. Here are some guidelines Your diabetes educator and physician will help you set your own goals. For some people, a blood sugar level below 80 mg is too low, while for others a level under 100 mg is too low. A level over 120 before a meal is too high for some, while for others it is normal. Keeping a record of SMBG test results is vital. You and your...

Genetic Manipulation

Genetic manipulation is part of the RNA and DNA research you may have read about. Simply put, genetic manipulation involves reprogramming a body cell to become a beta cell and produce insulin. Every single cell in the body contains the genetic information of all cells. If this information could be used to reprogram individual cells, it might be possible to train a skin cell or other tissue to be a beta cell. This way, a person's own cells could be used to produce insulin, eliminating the...

Exercise Programs for People with Diabetes

The best activities for you are vigorous aerobic exercises. Aerobic exercises use the large muscle groups, and improve stamina and overall health. Ask your diabetes educator for more information about aerobic exercise, or take a look at Exercise amp Diabetes , a pamphlet-workbook by Jean Kapetanios order from Area Health and Education Center, 81 Plantation Street, Worcester, MA 01605 or The Diabetic's Sports and Exercise Book by June Biermann and Barbara Toohey.

Pitfalls for Parents

An overanxious parent creates an overanxious child who is overdependent. By doing everything for your child, you deny him or her the self-control and self-confidence necessary for an independent life. An overindulgent parent feels dietary restrictions and daily injections are too much for a child to handle. He or she offers special treats while providing little discipline. Children of overindulgent parents may grow up under the impression that they are incompetent -- incapable of coping with...

Advice for Parents of Children with Diabetes

When you learned that your child has diabetes, you may have experienced disbelief, grief, and guilt. Maybe you asked, Why did this happen to my child Maybe you cried out, It's not fair You must come to grips with these feelings so that you can learn the tasks and techniques of diabetes control. Your whole family needs to make adjustments to your child's condition. How you deal with and accept diabetes affects the way your child deals with and accept diabetes. The more you know about diabetes,...